Santosh Baraily, a musician fighting caste-based atrocity through music

Santosh Baraily, a musician fighting caste-based atrocity through music

"Through music, people become aware of things that they are ignorant about; maybe it's only through music that people who have reached a breaking point and come back and become blessed with a new life. I believe the social stigmas which we face can be tackled through music one day," says Santosh Baraily, a musician from Legship, South Sikkim who fights against and raises awareness about caste-based discrimination through his music for around four years now.

His recent song 'Ke Rakhya Cha Jaatma', highlights the manmade nature of the caste order and has composed several similar songs pointing out caste-based social stigmas.

"Nowadays, the cases of atrocity are occurring in Sikkim especially in the Nepali section of the society, we are humans and we have to leave this world one day to a place where no such allocation is done in the basis of caste or any other. So do people in the society have caste-based discrimination and judge it”, points out Baraily. “Caste system is a manmade system, which was never created by nature or god, its only gender which was created, all other things existing today are all man creation” he added

“I myself have faced caste-based discrimination, once when I was travelling in a public transport people around were addressing us the schedule tribe as ‘Pani muni to jaat’, I believe its high time that things should change and treat everyone same and equally in the society”.

According to NCRB data 1,06,782 incidents of crime against Scheduled Caste were recorded during 2011-2013, while the number went up to 1,19,872 in the period 2014-2016.  The caste system is a deep-rooted social evil, especially in India which hasn’t been eradicated despite the massive changes made in society. In fact, India’s caste system is the world’s longest surviving social hierarchy. Cases of atrocity against the 'lower castes' still exist and are ignored by society.

"Caste is divided into 4 categories Brahmin, Kshatriyas, Vaishyas & Shudras, but when translated Caste actually means ‘Jati’, which according to Scriptures indicates one person’s Community or Group. However, the four castes which we are discussing is called “Varna”, which is defined by one person’s karma, work or activities. It is said that today in society these categories are misused & discrimination prevails and inequality is growing in our society. Do you know why it is happening? It is because we are tagging people with Varna by birth", says Diwas Hangmang, an advocate. 

“A Varna cannot be decided by birth. I am not saying this but most of our Scriptures do say. Just like it is clearly mentioned in the 18th Chapter of Bhagavad Gita and you may read, “O Arjuna, all the different qualities of work of the various castes in society namely the Brahmins, Kshatriyas, Vaishyas & Shudras are determined by the innate mode of their Nature (Gunas)” – Bhagavad Gita 18-4” he added

India’s caste system is perhaps the world’s longest surviving social hierarchy. Prejudice, especially arising due to caste, runs very deep in our society. What’s even more disheartening is that; it is not just the adults but even the children who are subjected to caste discrimination. According to the NCRB data 1,06,782 incidents of crime against Scheduled Caste were recorded during 2011-2013, while the number went up to 1,19,872 in the period 2014-2016.  The caste system is a deep-rooted social stigma especially in India which hasn’t been changed despite people living has been changing themselves according to the change in time. In fact, India’s caste system, the world’s longest surviving social hierarchy. Such cases of atrocity still exist and still is ignored by society.

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